Tessellations

Tessellations

Class Description

Intricate tessellations are beautiful, but they can be intimidating to make. This class introduces students to M.C. Escher, the artist that made tessellations popular. activities help students understand the geometry behind these patterns. Students will be fascinated with the creative project through which they learn how to make their own unique tessellations. This class supports Mathematical Practices. 


Grade Level: 38
LINK: Art Class: Radial Symmetry
LINK: Planetarium Program: Chaos and Order: A Mathematical Symphony

State Standards, Benchmarks, and GLEs

Grade 3

Louisiana State Standards Visual Art

VA- CE-E6 Identify relationships among visual arts, other arts, and disciplines outside the arts

VA-CA-E1 View works of art and express observations about how the elements and principles of design are used in the works

VA-HP-E6 Recognize great artists and works of art that have shaped the history of art

VA- AP-E4 Recognize that there are many possibilities and choices in the processes for designing and producing visual arts

CCSS, Mathematics

Measurement and data

Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition.

3.MD.7. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.

a. Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.

b. Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.

c. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.

d. Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.

Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures and distinguish between linear and area measures.

3.MD.8. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.

Geometry

Reason with shapes and their attributes.

3.G.1. Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.

3.G.2. Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.

CCSS, ELA/Literacy: Speaking and Listening

Comprehension and collaboration

3.SL.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

3.SL.3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

Presentation of knowledge and ideas

3.SL.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

3.SL.6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 3 Language standards 1 and 3 on page 28 for specific expectations.)

CCSS, ELA/Literacy: Language

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

3.L.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them).

 

 

Grades 4–8

Louisiana State Standards Visual Art

VA-CE-M6 Students will understand and visually express relationships among visual arts, other arts, and disciplines outside the arts

VA-CA-M1 Students will view works of art and analyze how artists use design elements and principles to achieve an aesthetic effect
VA-HP-M6 Students will identify major works of great and influential artists and recognize their achievements
VA-AP-M4 Students will demonstrate awareness of various new ideas, possibilities, options, and situations pertaining to the art world

CCSS, Mathematics

Measurement and data

Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit.

4.MD.3. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. For example, find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor.

Geometric measurement: understand concepts of angle and measure angles.

4.MD.5. Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement:

a. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a “one-degree angle,” and can be used to measure angles.

b. An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure of n degrees.

4.MD.7. Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure.

Geometry

Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.

4.G.1. Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.

4.G.2. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles.

4.G.3. Recognize a line of symmetry for a two-dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

CCSS, ELA/Literacy: Speaking and Listening

Comprehension and collaboration

4.SL.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

4.SL.3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.

Presentation of knowledge and ideas

4.SL.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

4.SL.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 4 Language standards 1 on page 28 for specific expectations.)

CCSS, ELA/Literacy: Language

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

4.L.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation).

AAM

LASM is fully accredited in accordance with the standards of excellence prescribed by the American Alliance of Museums.

ACGBR-LDAThese programs have been made possible in part through the generous support of the East Baton Rouge City-Parish Government; the members of LASM; the Community Fund for the Arts of Greater Baton Rouge; the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Louisiana State Arts Council; and the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism.
Louisiana Art & Science Museum | 100 River Road S. | Baton Rouge | Louisiana | 225.344.5272 | www.lasm.org
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